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last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
in the united states who have been educated in our schools, to give them the opportunity to stay here. you know, wouldn't we rather be known as a country of dreamers, than a country of illegal aliens? [applause] and as we saw last night, this is the commander in chief who finally brought osama bin laden to justice. [applause] now that is presidential leadership. but even before barack obama was elected president, we knew he was going to be a great leader. we knew it when he chose joe biden as his running mate. [applause] joe was the perfect choice, because like the president, he had lived the american dream, going from humble middle-class roots, to the united states senate, to the vice presidency of the united states. [applause] and we all know from his incredible speech last night that he has been side by side with the president's, fighting to make sure that we open the doors of opportunity for all americans, working to create good jobs and to invest in education, to make health care and retirement and schools affordable for everyone. it is what he has fought for his entire career. [applause]
that open new plants and train new workers right here in the united states of america we can reward those companies that build right here and double their exports. we can create 1 million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. you can make that happen. >> i want to create a future where everyone who wants a job can find a job. where no senior figures for their security of their retirement and every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads to a good job and a bright horizon. and unlike the president, i have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. host: has either campaign in specific on how they plan to create 1 million new jobs? politics is not my area, but from what i have followed i have not seen at all specifically this is going to happen. its romney's plan, one of five. is to reduce the deficit. but it is not clear how it leads to more jobs in a direct way. obviously, overall, a strong quake -- stronger economy and reduced debt leads to a better economic environment. but as you cut contractors, teachers, whatever -- anytime government is cutting spending, c
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
in and see him. him is the president of the united states. he's very much a junior partner. that is the new vice presidency. and that's what's really changed. it began under mondale and was that way to our country -- well, it wasn't so useful under cheney but i think now the vice president is a junior partner. he's explained to barack obama. looking up to him as a smarter guy, perhaps a tougher guy. but certainly with great loyalty. >> ed shultz, we're leading up to the president's speech. what are your impressions there? >> he was trying really hard tonight. he was trying to get as emotionally connected to the audience as he possibly could. it wasn't his smoothest performance, but it was effective. you could tell the crowd was involved. they know this man. they know what he's about. he's a genuine guy. high on sincerity, believable. i thought it was good testimony to the president. >> chris? >> i don't think we've seen that pitch of the president so far. the idea that it's about his judgment and what's in his gut and this kind of undescribable part of his being that can make the right call
privilege as far as being a citizen of the united states to vote and be part of the process. that is all i have to say. host: frank newport, it sounded like from the comments last night by mitt romney that they were really focusing on from here on out approaching voters who had voted for obama in 2008 and looking to lure them to the romney campaign. is there any way that gallup will be checking that attempt? guest: absolutely straight -- absolutely. we track daily. for a republican to win, they have to pull back in some of those voters. if the same scenario happens this year that unfolded in 2008, obama is going to win again. republicans have two goals -- one is to activate the core republican voters and get them to turn out, which is easier for republicans and democrats, because republicans are more likely to vote. they have characteristics like age and education that make them more likely to vote. the second task is to pull down at 7% margin that obama had over mccain, so they have to come in to become a convert some of those people who went for obama to go to romney, or they were going
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
/11, and thanks to the is on the road to defeat and bin the united states of america. [applause] back. all the troops from bliss highlanders. deployed later this year. fight. you know this. ultimate sacrifice, including day last month. our message to them was this. we will honor them always. pushed the taliban back. month. war responsibly. lead for their own security. in 2014, the transition will be complete. never again. [applause] think about it. and afghanistan. thirds. home. and what does that mean for you? prepare for the future. your spouses and your kids. stronger. restore american leadership. don't you believe it. our alliances have never been gaddafi. leadership. top. [applause] incredible service. war, we are destroying terrorist leadership. proud that the united states is is more respected in the world. a pledge. have served us. in them. to your families. hey. [laughter] interest. when we do, we will give me the equipment and a clear mission to get the job done. [applause] world, bar none. superiority. [applause] to scare you. find a plan to reduce the including defense. threate
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., september 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the senate is now considering the motion to proceed to s. 3547, the veterans job corps act. 70 minutes will be equally divided this morning between the two leaders or their designees with the republicans controlling the first half and the majority controlling the final half. we'll begin consideration of veterans jobs bill today. it's unfortunate that we're having to go through all this, another couple of filibusters on this bill. but th
and a white america and latino america and asian america. there's a united states of america. >> eight years after the keynote that launched his national career, four years after becoming the nation's first african-american nominee, tonight president barack obama accepts the nomination a second time. tonight the president makes his case for four more years. >> four more years. >> america needs four more years. >> tonight more from the first lady, vice president biden, caroline kennedy, the foo fighters? yes, the foo fighters. weather moved tonight indoors. but after a first night owned by michelle obama, after a second night owned by president clinton, expectations for the finale are sky high. msnbc's primetime coverage of the democratic national convention's final night begins right now. >>> thank you for joining us. i'm rachel maddow here at msnbc headquarters in new york. i'm joined by ed shultz, melissa harris-perry, chris hayes, and the senior strategist steve schmidt. lawrence o'donnell and al sharpton will be joining us in a moment. leading us from the site of the convention is our co
in the united states, but done in france which is a modern labor market where i think there are some lessons. the code-talkers actually convinced the french government to do something i hope we can convince our -- co-authors actually convince the french government to do something i hope we can convince our government to do, which is to experiment with widespread unemployment services programs and look at what the effects on the labor market are not just by randomizing an individual having access to the program, but breaking france up into different geographic areas of labor markets and providing 100% of the people access in some areas, in some areas , in some areas 55%, some areas 25%. if you do that randomly, on average, if you're in an area where a lot of other people use this program, does that have a negative effect on you? what they found is in tight labor markets, basically the programs really helped people get into jobs more quickly. when the labor market is weak, is largely a game of musical chairs. one person getting a job makes another person have a more difficult time. thinking ab
's commercial capital. >>> we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the dramatic highs and lows in the race for the white house. now in full swing with the conventions over in both campaigns laser focused on november. the spotlight had barely cooled for president obama's big night when the latest unemployment report cast a shadow over the democratics' post-convention glow. mitt romney called it the hangover to the party in charlotte. the labor department says u.s. employers added only 96,000 jobs in august, fewer than expected, although the jobless rate did fall to 8.1%. our chief business correspondent, ali velshi, is joining us now to take a closer look inside the numbers. ali, the unemployment rate went down, but that's not necessarily a positive development. explain what's going on. >> you know, i've said for years that it's just easier to look at the number of jobs created or lost as opposed to the unemployment rate. and i'll explain that to you in a second. but the number of jobs added i
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
, there is not a liberal america or a conservative america, but a united states of america. >> reporter: he has made a sport of outspeaking the adversary. >> john mccain says that he would like to follow osama bin laden to the gates of hell, but he won't follow him to the gates where he lives. >> reporter: and yet he faces the biggest challenge tonight, can barack obama top barack obama? >> the expectations game tonight works against the president. it is a speech that will be compared to the '08 speech. >> reporter: obama comes from a long line of presidential party candidates who faced similar challenges. recall bill clinton's snoozer of a speech. >> in closing -- [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: became history when it was replaced by the 1992 rousing speech. >> i have news for those defenders of greed and the status quo, your time has come and gone. >> reporter: it is up to obama to live up to clinton's second successful convention speech. >> tonight, let us resolve to build that bridge to the 21st century to meet our challenges and protect our values. >> the president has to make a case for h
international indebtedness. if the united states economy is not as strong as it has been in the past, we cannot protect our values around the globe, and we cannot negotiate with bankers. this gives us serious weaknesses on the economic and national-security front. the ultimate insult, we handed to the next generation that had no safe in the kinds of things we have seen go on and ask them to pick up the bill, and that seems like a gross injustice and mass. gerri: i want you to respond to something, david axelrod, the president's base of riser said about this and why the president is doing the right thing. here he is. >> the president's plan would do what the simpson bowles plan would do, cut the deficit by $4 trillion, reduce attack under our deficits down to 3 percent of the gross domestic product which is what everybody agrees we need to stabilize the debt. then we will be in a position to begin reducing it further. gerri: what do you make of that. >> perfect except for a couple of flaws. we have not seen the growth and are not likely to get the kind of growth that they assume in those budget
graduates in the united states right now who are basically indentured servants because they have these brutal unforgiving loans and they don't have jobs to be able to pay them back because wages are declining, we have high entrenched unemployment, and the jobs that are coming back are low wage, insecure, poor benefit jobs. so if you took student loans -- students, who are very good at communicating on the internet, if they decided they were going to create a peaceful revolution in the ballot box, they could do so because our campaign is the one solution that's will to, number one, forgive student debt, instead of bailing out the banks again for another trillion dollars, which is what the latest quantitative easing is going to do, we could -- we could be bailing out the students with the quantitative easing, buying up the bad debt in the student securities, the student loan securities, and essentially wiping out student debt because public higher education is a public good, we provided public education through high school degree, throughout the 20th century, but in the 21st centur
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
as assistant secretary of the navy and went on to become vice president and president of the united states. in 1916, roosevelt the secretary of the navy. he has been appointed to the record as the associate justice by president william howard taft. but he resigned in 1916 to become the republican candidate for president and he ran against woodrow wilson and a dreadful campaign he was the odds favor, but ultimately lost california by 4000 votes and therefore the election. he went to bed the night of the election thinking he had one. franklin roosevelt was said that wilson supporter went to bed thinking he's had one also. and the next morning the returns from the midwest and particularly california came in and it turned out that wilson one the election just rarely. roosevelt continued as assistant secretary of the navy and then he has to act to private practice in new york city. roosevelt in 1920 became the vice residential candidate of the democratic party, running with governor james cox of ohio. they got trapped by calvin coolidge and warren harding, coolidge's republican party. and at th
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
of the united states. i've got a very effective campaign doing a very good job, but not everything i say is elegant and i want to make it very clear, i want to help 100% of the people. >> dave: he followed up by saying, you know, you didn't totally answer that question, but to romney's point. do you need a complete change of direction or turn around or campaign better and minimize mistake. comes down to debate. october 3rd the big first debate. >> and like that he addressed the 47%, hey, i wasn't an elegant speaker and i do want to help all americans. >> clayton: now more on that, and could it come down to foreign policy? we'll ask chris wallace about that coming up in a little bit. the number of able bodied americans on food stamps has doubled as president obama changed to welfare reform law. how can it be a fair and balanced debate. >> not so sweet 16. thousands of teenagers showing up and reuting in the streets. ahead. ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to free my soul ♪ ♪ where's the party, i want to lose control ♪ ♪ where's the party (car horn) paying with your smartphone ins
opposition. overseas president obama restored the reputation of the united states within the community. dialling a and collaboration are once again possible with the return of spirit and trust and good will to our foreign policy. of course, there remains much to do. communities across america and countries around the world, life is too hard for too many people. we see their struggle and also our hearts go out to them. in the coming years our hands must continue to reach out to them. after all that remains to be done and at home and abroad, the evidence is overwhelming. president obama is a leader for america and we faison slaught of some of the most complicated and international challenges to confront any u.s. president in modern times. it is up to all of us to make sure that the american people understand exactly what is at stake. and at risk in this election. with president obama in oval office we can make good progress towards becoming a fairer, stronger, more prosperous america. and a nation adjusted to changing and challenging times, hold it true to unchanging principles. a leader
, perhaps even the first latino president of the united states. he knows full well why he was picked to give this speech. in his words he said, i'm young, and i'm hispanic. >> hey, everybody. i'm julian castro. >> reporter: first thing you need to know, it's pronounced julian castro. the j is silent. not julian. but even if you get the spanish wrong, don't worry. san antonio's mayor has never mastered spanish either. >> i understand it better than i speak it. i grew up in my household with my mother and grandmother mostly speaking english. i understand it, but speaking it back is always the challenge. >> reporter: julian castro's grandmother immigrated from mexico and worked in the chicano movement in san antonio. from the humble beginnings, julian and his twin brother went on to stanford university and harvard law school. now he is a rising star in the democratic party, tapped to give the keynote speech at the democratic convention, the same speech an unknown barack obama gave at the convention in 2004. >> you get talked about as someone who could be the first hispanic governor of texas. so
nomination for president of the united states. [ cheering and applause ] >> in address the president finished by telling americans they are the hope and the change in this election. he will be back on the campaign trail today last night's speech characterized the republican plan to rollback regulations and to cut taxes -- he cautioned some in his party to not depend on government to solve every problem and republicans who blame government as the major cause for the country's troubles. >> the president: we draw strength from our victories and we learn from our mistakes, but we keep our eye fixed on that distant horizon knowing providence is and that we are blessed to be citizens of the greatest nation on earth! [ cheering and applause ] >> democrats hope the president's message will resonate with voters knowing they most likely will not get much of a convention bounce in the tight race especially after the jobs numbers this morning. >>> he gave us a lot of hope that it is we the people who have brought us this far. >> he was the president of the united states speaking with the passion from his
, colorado. the president of the united states stopping. >> tens of millions of americans with preexisting conditioning by repealing reform. he calls it obama care. i like the name. i do care. we thought to pass that law for families like ryan's. we know the heartbreak of a broken health care system. i don't mind if folks think i care, i do care. and i don't know exactly what the other sides' proposing. i guess you can call it romney doesn't care but this law is here to stay. we are not going to refight the battles of the last four years. we are going to implement this law and make the health care system work for families all across america. it is time to move forward. that is the choice in this election. of course, this isn't just the only battle that they want to refight. they want to refight battles we thought were settled in the last century. in november you will have some say as to whether women should be trusted to make their own health care decisions. i think they are. you'll have some say as to whether students who were brought here by their parents as infants and have gone to scho
to vote for the president of the united states? that is not in the constitution. another one, where in the constitution is the education department? where in the constitution is the energy department? there are several instances similar to that. host: nancy writes -- arlington, virginia, philip, an independent scholar. what's your message to congress? caller: are we a reflection, the people of congress? we keep putting them in there. when people start to become enlightened again, where we might go. you have to take some responsibility for the mess we are in, the people. you can blame congress, but we don't want to look in the mirror at ourselves. the point i'm trying to make is our country is very divided right now. it's obvious. the wealthy, the middle, the poor, black, white, hispanic, all doing a pretty bad. we have to come together to fight the real issues that our country is facing. of course the economy is one. and to stay out of foreign entanglements, like barack obama is doing, unlike the bush administration. a fm radio and other stations are bent on negative comments about
's problems is the united states. >> there is no doubt that the world is in need of a new orderly. -- order. >> ahmadinejad took the podium here in new york and said america's days at the top are numbered. [chanting] >> protesters told him to take a hike. plus, campaign showdown in the must-win state of ohio. >> the path i'm offering may be harder but it leads to a better place. >> i know what to do and i will do what it takes to get this economy going. >> shepard: president obama and governor romney each back in the buckeye state with just days to go until the first votes are cast. and ♪ ♪ moon river ♪ wider than a mile. >> shepard: tonight, saying good by to the legendary crooner andy williams. first from fox this wednesday night the president of iran is back in the country he says the united states is in cahoots with the devil and israelis are uncivillized. now the world is reacting to mahmoud ahmadinejad's latest anti-west rhetoric today at the united nations. the president of ahmadinejad took the podium at the u.n. general assembly and while his speech was not as fiery as some of
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the west. but khrushchev actually realized th
clock on the convention floor. this is why. the united states pushing that 16 trillion mark yesterday. what does that mean for a president who wants a second term. we'll discuss and dismiss the debt like they do. chris christy said what is wrong with washington? well nancy pelosi. >> she is part of the problem. it is true. listen, any of the leaders are up there if they are not trying to make a difference. >> brian: chris christy sounded off and sang a bit with jimmie fallon. we'll bring it out because you were probably nodding off when he was talking to chris christie. all next for the 2012 election . ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> >> gretchen: good morning. i needed that election surge to get me through hump day. i needed that election. thank you for making my day. >> brian: we are wednesday and two more days left of the convention and we'll know here until friday morning. yesterday it was clear, we need more time and we are off to a great start and need more time. >> steve: plus we might need more umbrellas. supper time, it was coming down. >> brian: i didn't notice that. >> gretche
of the island and here in the united states, the east coast is not out of play either. so let's get right to alexandra steel. she is at cnn hurricane headquarters. what can you tell us? >> it's not as bad as it could be for bermuda. bermuda sees hurricanes about three every ten years and it's moving farther east than we'd seen it before. this is the atlantic. we do have two hurricanes at play. there's leslie. here is michael. this is a category 2, it is small, tight, powerful. 105-mile-an-hour winds. good news, won't affect anyone, won't affect land. so with that, our attention turns to leslie. now, right now it's category 1, maximum sustained winds at 75 miles an hour. what's happened is it has sat over the same space, kind of the cold water for the last 18 hours or so. so we have not seen any intensification. so that is the good news. here is the projected path. now, you can see here is bermuda right now, it's about 430 miles south/southeast of bermuda, expected to make the past farther east than earlier thought sunday morning. so here are the impacts. this area east of haley fax cou ha
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